Pink Diamond

Natural pink diamonds are spectacular stones that are crowd favourites when it comes to picking gems and it’s easy to see why. They can spark romantic thoughts when you look at one, but it’s also synonymous with luxurious living. On top of this they’re scarce, which is yet another draw card.
Pink Diamond
Popularity also increases their worth and according to experts at the Argyle Diamond Mine, for a pink gem you can pay up to 20x the price of a white stone that’s the same size.

That clarifies why the rich and famous, including the Queen and Victoria Beckham wear pink diamonds.
When you start researching these fascinating stones it gets interesting.

For one thing, there’s not much gemmological data of pink diamonds.

But we’re here to share what there is to know.
Why are These Pink Stones?
The grading for these pink stones resembles grading used for colored diamonds in general, with names such as ‘Fancy vivid’, ‘Fancy deep’, ‘Faint’ and more.

The most expensive stones are those where the color is very strong.
Pink isn’t the only color you’ll see in these stones.

You can often find:
  • Purple or purplish hues, depending on the strength of the hue
  • Orange or orangy for weaker colors
  • Brown colors, or brownish if it’s a very weak hue
These are secondary hues and will be mentioned in the stone’s documents, with the reference to pink being the second hue noted in the naming of the stone.
While you can find out where most colored stones get their hues from, such as green gems that have carbon atoms that have been displaced, it’s not so easy to explain when it comes to pink diamonds.

The reasons for the hues aren’t clear to experts, although some speculate that it could be because of deformations.

This may happen when stones move upwards to the surface of the earth and possibly it could change a diamond’s structure, affecting how it would absorb the light.
Where do They Come From?
These pink gems can be found across the globe, from South Africa to Russia and Canada & even Brazil.

But it’s in Australia where you’ll find the best of them, if you travel to the Rio Tinto’s Argyle Mine.

The mine has a main office in Perth and it also offers the services of cutting & polishing the stones.

Only through exclusive tendering can you purchase one of their stones.
To explain the rarity of pink stones, we provide this explanation:

The mine may obtain 1 000 000ct of rough diamonds through mining, but only 1ct will be suitable for the tendering process. And that’s where their value comes from!
1ct is the size you’ll find most often with pink gems and usually 40 – 50 stones make it onto the market in a year.

That isn’t much! You’ll have to pay between $100 000 and $1 Million/carat to own one of them, or even more.

The price will depend on:
  • Hue intensity
  • The cut
  • How clear the diamond is
Fewer and fewer diamonds are coming onto the market, so buyers want to secure their stones before there are none to pick from.

Australia did open a new mine, Kimberley based, that will hopefully add more stones to the market again.

It’s an underground mine that will be open throughout 2020 if all goes to plan.

There will be all types of diamonds mined—it could be a total of 20 000 000ct—and pink diamonds will hopefully be included, even if only a small number of them.
Pink Diamonds: The Price You Have to Pay
Pink diamonds have some of the highest price tags on the gem market, especially intense and vivid stones.

For them the prices are equal to those of rare blue gems.

Even for small diamonds you’ll have to pay a considerable amount.
Price is affected by modifying hues, so you can pay a little less if you pick a stone that has brown hues apart from the pink color.

There are more of these types of stones than some other pink diamonds, so their price tags are lower.

In contrast, purple hues aren’t found often, and the rarity results in higher prices.
Some Famous Pink Stones
Diamond history has seen many famous pink stones, such as:
  • Daria-i-Noor: It’s a 186ct table cut pink diamond.

    It formed part of the crown jewels for a long time and was worn by several royals, but it was taken back to Persia in 1739.
  • Noor-ul-Ain: Its other name is ‘the light of the eye’, referring to the pale pink hue.

    It was found in India at the Golconda mines and became part of a tiara in 1958 for Empress Farah Pahlavi’s wedding outfit.
  • Graff Pink Diamond: This Type IIa pink diamond is 24.78ct and cost $46 000 000 in 2010 when it was purchased at Sotheby’s.
  • Martian Pink stone: This is also a Type IIa stone and before the Graff Pink Diamond it held the record for highest price paid for a pink stone: $17.4 million.
  • Rose of Dubai: This fancy pink weighs 25.02ct and was worth $6 000 000. The pear shaped stone was sold for that price in 2005.
  • Steinmetz Pink: This is an oval cut stone that weighs 59.60ct. It was mined in South Africa and is extremely valuable thanks to the grading of ‘internally flawless’.
  • Shah Jahaan: The light pink stone is table-cut and weighs 56.71ct.
  • Princie Diamond: Here you have a fancy intense pink stone with a VS2 rating when it comes to clarity.

    It’s a 34.65ct stone and in 2013 Christie’s auctioned it for $39.3 million.
Pink diamonds are worth the investment if you’re lucky enough to find one.

Will you be one of the lucky ones?
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Share on reddit
Reddit
Share on print
Print
Share on email
Email

Leave a Replay

Related Posts:

DIANOCHE

Dianoche PTE Ltd. is a diamond manufacturer registered in Singapore, as well as a diamond jewellery retailer. Our company is comprised of veterans in the world of diamonds and high-end jewellery.

Recent Posts

Follow Us

Shopping cart

0

No products in the cart.

Search

Skip to content